World Hypertension Day

Today is World Hypertension Day. High blood pressure is one of the most prevalent health conditions in the world, with almost half of adults in certain regions affected Also, it is called the “silent killer”, as it is the deadliest risk factor for global death, and its presence is unknown by a large number of adults.

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Turning your blood blue: How anthocyanins help maintain vascular health

A recent study has revealed that anthocyanins seemed to improve blood flow and may help maintain vascular health after 1 month of daily intake. Anthocyanins are found in many fruits, vegetables and other plants, conferring them their red, purple or blue colors. Some examples are many berries such as blueberries (such as the referenced article), blackberry, raspberry, bilberry; as well as other plants such as eggplant, black rice, red cabbage and red apples.

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The Planetary Health Diet: How to Feed 10 Billion and Save the Planet

A group of over 30 scientists met in Oslo on January 17th to try to solve an upcoming problem: how are we going to feed 10 billion people without using up all our natural resources?

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Move more, Sit less: Why having an active lifestyle is easier than you think

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise a week (or 75 minutes of vigorous), plus strength exercise twice a week. However, recent studies have shown that, in the US, almost 80% do not meet these recommendations (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr112.pdf). One of the major reasons for this low level of participation is the seemingly high point of entry; maintaining that level of activity seems too daunting to achieve.

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mHealth: Are we ready for it?

Mobile and wearable technologies are advancing at an alarming rate, with a special focus in consumer health. We have recently heard of the Apple watch becoming the first FDA-approved wearable device that can perform electrocardiograms.

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The importance of incentives in weight loss and exercise

We’ve all gone through this: you decide to take up running, cycling, join a gym or start a diet. You’re all hyped up with the idea, buy new sports gear, download the latest health app that tracks your time exercising, read about the latest diet fad, and start off towards your new you.

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Correlation between Depression and Heart Disease, and how Exercise cures both

There is a strong correlation between depression and heart disease. Several studies have shown that those with depression have increased risk of arrhythmia, while individuals with heart disease are more likely to be depressed. So how can this vicious cycle be stopped? Well, recent studies have shown that exercise can be as effective as anti-depressant drugs, and cuts the risk of heart disease by half. This is especially relevant at mid- and advanced age, where the prevalence for these two conditions are higher.

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Healthy Weight: too little can be as hazardous as too much

There is an enormous amount of information and news regarding the risks of being overweight for your health, especially due to recent studies indicating that the prevalence has dramatically increased in the past 30 years.

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New article! Metabolaid and its effect on satiety

We are happy to announce that a scientific peer-reviewed article on Metabolaid has been recently published in the journal Food and Function.

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Do What I Say, not What I Do: How the Mediterranean Region is Abandoning its Roots

A new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) has recently published a study regarding the prevalence of obesity in children around the globe (related post). One of the more remarkable results indicates that the highest rates in child obesity is ironically in the countries where one of the healthiest diets in the world is born: the Mediterranean.

The reason for this is mainly due to what is observed worldwide; the increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and the high amount of processed, high fat/sugar foods in the daily menus of the children. Our lifestyle has changed dramatically in recent years, and our children have suffered the consequences.

Fortunately, the intervention programs implemented in recent years seem to working. In this sense, a 2-7% decrease has been reported in Spain, Italy, Greece and Portugal. But rather than celebrate, we must work harder in lowering this prevalence, as it is still of the highest in the world. Although it can be a daunting task, we must make a special effort at home with our children, to increase their daily physical activity, and add more fruits, vegetables and healthier alternatives in their diet. We must do this, for the sake of their future health.

Jonathan Jones

Product Development Manager / Digital Health Scientific Adviser

Reference: you can find the report here